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British Policies Imposed on America from 1763 to 1775

The British policies in American colonies were oppressive and prevented the local population from the free economic development. In this regard, the British used different methods to oppress the local population, including economic methods, through the maintenance of control over the sea trade between colonies and Europe, and the military methods, involving the open confrontation with colonials. Naturally, in response to the oppression from the part of Britain, the colonials had elaborated their own methods of struggle, including both peaceful, such as the development of its economy and accelerated industrialization, and violent ones, including military attacks on the British.

In fact, the use of peaceful methods of struggle was quite effective in terms of rising the public consciousness of colonials to start active struggle against the British. In this regard, colonials had published newspapers and leaflets to promote the idea of the opposition and boycott of the British goods. However, these methods could not bring positive outcomes as the British controlled the trade and had the military and political power of the US.

The violent struggle was the next step, which was more effective, and which completed the struggle that began as peaceful opposition to the oppression of colonials by the British. In this regard, it is possible to refer to Boston Tea Party, which was the ultimate, violent manifestation of the struggle of colonials against the British, when the colonials, being in a desperate position, just had thrown the tea bags into Boston Harbor. In such a way, they rebelled against the monopolistic position of the West India Company that controlled the trade and prevented colonials from the development of their business.

References:

Ray, R. (2004). Founding Myths: Stories That Hide Our Patriotic Past. New York: The New Press.
Thomas, P. D. G. (1987). The Townshend Duties Crisis: The Second Phase of the American Revolution, 1767–1773. Oxford: Oxford University Press.